The Next Problems to Solve in Augmented Reality

I’m totally amped up about Project Tango. After having worked with augmented reality for a few years, most of the problems I’ve seen with current platforms could be solved with a miniaturized depth-sensing Kinect-style sensor. The Myriad 1 is a revolutionary chip that will dramatically change the quality of experience you get from augmented reality applications–both on mobile devices and wearables.

There’s a few other issues in AR I’d like to see addressed. Perhaps they are in research papers, but I haven’t seen anything real yet. Maybe they require some custom hardware as well.

Real-world lighting simulation.

One of the reasons virtual objects in augmented reality look fake is because AR APIs can’t simulate the real-world lighting environment in a 3D engine. For most applications, you place a directional light pointing down to and turn up the ambient for a vague approximation of overhead lighting. This is assuming the orientation of the object you’re tracking is upright, of course.

Camera Birds AR mode using an overhead directional light.

Camera Birds AR mode using an overhead directional light.

What I’d really like to use is Image Based Lighting. Image based Lighting is a computationally efficient way to simulate environmental lighting without filling a scene up with dynamic lights. It uses a combination of cube maps built from HDR photos with custom shaders to produce great results. A good example of this is the Marmoset Skyshop plug-in for Unity3D.

Perhaps with a combination of sensors and 360 cameras you can build HDR cubemaps out of the viewer’s local environment in real-time to match environmental lighting. Using these with Image Based Lighting will be a far more accurate lighting model than what’s currently available. Maybe building rudimentary cubemaps out of the video feed is a decent half-measure.

Which object is moving?

In a 3D engine, virtual objects drawn on top of image targets are rendered with two types of cameras. Ether the camera is moving around the object, or the object is moving around the camera. In real life, the ‘camera’ is your eye–so the it should move if you move your head. If you move an image target, that is effectively moving the virtual object.

Current AR APIs have no way of knowing whether the camera or the object is moving. With Qualcomm’s Vuforia, you can either tell it to always move the camera around the object, or to move the objects around the camera. This can cause problems with lighting and physics.

For instance, on one project I was asked to make liquid pour out of a virtual glass when you tilt the image target it rest upon. To do this I had to force Vuforia to assume the image target was moving–so then the image target tilted, so would the 3D object in the game engine and liquid would pour. Only problem is, this would also happen if I had moved the phone as well. Vuforia can’t tell what’s actually moving.

There needs to be a way to accurately track the ‘camera’ movement of either the wearable or mobile device so that in the 3D scene the camera and objects can be positioned accurately. This will allow for lighting to be realistically applied and for moving trackable objects to behave properly in a 3D engine. Especially with motion tracking advances such as the M7 chip, I suspect there are some good algorithmic solutions to factoring out the movement of the object and the observer to solve this problem.

Anyway, these are the kind of problems you begin to think about when staring at augmented reality simulations for years. Once you get over the initial appeal of AR’s gimmick, the practical implications of the technology poses many questions. I’ve applied for my Project Tango devkit and really hope I get my hands on one soon!

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One thought on “The Next Problems to Solve in Augmented Reality

  1. Pingback: My Week With Project Tango | Ralph Barbagallo's Self Indulgent Blog

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