A Few Quick Notes: GDC2013 Edition

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GDC 2013 Rundown

GDC has become increasingly irrelevant over the past 5 years or so as influence has moved away from the realm of cloistered AAA console game teams and to so-called “indie” developers and the disruptive platforms of mobile and social. Because of this, you can get much better information having conversations with other developers. I spent most of GDC talking to people–you can always watch the good presentations on the GDC Vault.

The trend for 2013 is an industry wide panic over free2play. Presentations and panels worried over whether f2p games are ethical and how the game industry is supposed to survive through this disruption. Considering this is a conversation game developers have been having since 2009, it just goes to show how long it takes for GDC to catch on to major trends.

“Indie” developers were the big celebrities this year. So much so that formerly closed platforms from Nintendo and Sony bent over backwards to encourage garage developers to create content. Nintendo greatly loosened requirements for their development program and even revealed HTML5 support for the Wii U. Sony eliminated concept approval. This shows there are some radical changes ahead for the next generation–Changes I suggested years ago on this blog.

The biggest star of the show was Oculus VR. The wait time to try the Oculus Rift headset grew to over 2 and a half hours by the final day of GDC. I got in to see it and came away hopeful, but unimpressed. The current prototype headset is uncomfortable, but I didn’t spent much time adjusting it. The display resolution is low, causing a screen door effect. When I turned my head, the screen smeared to the point where I couldn’t see anything.

These problems are being addressed. They showed me the physical part for the new screen–the retail version of Oculus will fix the resolution and latency issues. The current kit is strictly for developers and mega-nerdy early adopters. It’s pretty neat for a $300 prototype, but far from a finished product.

I was more impressed with Infinite Z’s zSpace virtual holography system that was on display at Unity3D’s booth. It costs over 10X what Oculus does for no apparent reason. Still, being able to draw 3D splines in thin air and look around them was really cool.

Overall, GDC had a lot of opportunity on display as far as new devices, markets, and tools–but a lot of uncertainty on how to actually make money producing games.

Favorite Quotes of GDC

  • “Cokeheads are better than publishers.”

  • “They said they’d publish my game if I turn it into a Skinner-box.”

  • “The reason why you won’t close the deal is because you’re too competent.”

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