VR with a Gamepad Sucks

I was kind of bummed my first day of Oculus Connect 2.

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Last year’s Oculus Connect was revelatory to me. Despite having worked on two different Gear VR titles at the time, the Crescent Bay demo was incredible in comparison. From Oculus’ own vignette demos to Epic’s Showdown sequence–the leap in quality from DK2 to Crescent Bay was astounding. Everyone walked out of that demo with a huge simile on their faces.

The first demos I tried at OC2 were the Gamepad demos. Oculus spent an absurd amount of time at their E3 keynote talking about how amazing it was that they were launching with the XBox 360 controller as the input device. At Oculus Connect, I put this claim to the test.

Every game from EVE Valkyrie to Edge of Nowhere seemed like playing a regular video game strapped to my face. I felt like I was playing an XBOX One through binoculars. In fact, a few of the games made me a little queasy–which I’m usually not susceptible to.

Maybe I’m just jaded having been developing gamepad VR experiences on Gear VR for a while, I thought.

Later on I tried Toybox which is a cool tech demo but doesn’t really illustrate how you’d play an actual game for any length of time with the Touch controllers. In fact, I found the controllers a little hard to use compared to the Vive. They have tons of confusing buttons and getting the finger gestures right seemed to take a little bit of work.

I was leaving the demo area and getting ready to head home when a friend of mine who works for Oculus stopped to ask what I thought. I told him honestly that I felt last year’s demos were better–they were more immersive and interesting. Although a little taken aback at my impressions, he strongly suggested I come by tomorrow for the next set of demos. He couldn’t tell me what they were, but promised they’d be awesome.

The Oculus Connect app sent a notification alerting me that new demo registrations would be available at 8 AM. I set my alarm and woke up the next morning to register for the Touch demos via my iPhone. I promptly slept through the keynote and arrived on the scene at noon for my demo.

We were only allowed to try two games, and it was heavily suggested I try Epic’s “Bullet Train” experience. Having not seen the keynote, I had no idea what I was getting into.

Bullet Train is mind blowing.

Bullet Train is essentially Time Crisis in VR. When I saw the Showdown demo last year I thought a game like this in VR would be a killer app. One of my favorite coin-ops of all time is Police 911–which motion tracks your body with a pair of cameras to duck behind obstacles. I thought doing this in VR would be amazing. However, last year there were no hand tracking controls–it was just a vague idea.

Here, Epic took the Touch controllers and made an incredible arcade shooter experience that should be a killer app should Epic choose to develop this further. Oculus really needs to do everything in their power to get Epic to produce this as a launch title for the Touch controllers.

The touch controls make all the difference. From handling weapons and grenades to plucking bullets out of the air in slow motion, Bullet Train really drives home how flexible the Touch controls are. Unlike Vive which is like holding a set of tools, these let you reach out and grab stuff–Even pump a shotgun.

The combination of standing in a motion tracked volume and visceral interaction with the world using your hands–even with Touch’s primitive finger gesture technology–really immerses you in an experience way beyond what’s possible sitting in a chair with an XBox controller.

It’s disappointing that Touch won’t launch with Oculus’ headset. Hand tracking is absolutely required for a truly immersive experience. Developing games that support both Gamepad and Touch control is going to be difficult without diluting features for one or the other. I’ve experienced a similar issues developing games that work with Gear VR’s touchpad and Bluetooth gamepad.

I left Oculus Connect 2 I reinvigorated with the feeling that VR with hand tracking is the One True VR Experience. Gamepad is fine for mobile VR at the moment, but all of my PC and Console VR projects are now being designed around Touch and hand tracked input. It’s the only way!

One thought on “VR with a Gamepad Sucks

  1. Pingback: The Basics of Hand Tracked VR Input Design | Ralph Barbagallo's Self Indulgent Blog

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