The Beginner’s Guide: Dave the Madman Edition

I recently played The Beginner’s Guide after buying it during the annual Holiday Steam Sale over the break. It’s a quick play through, and an interesting way to tell a story within a game. Without giving too much away, the experience reminded me of a similar event in my young-adulthood–When I encountered an amazing game developer who created incredible works I couldn’t hope to match. I’ve since forgotten his real name and don’t know much about him.  But I do have the 4 double-sided floppy disks he sent me of all his games at the time.

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Madsoft 1-4, recovered in great condition

This was the early ‘90s–I’d say around 1990-1991. I had made a bunch of Commodore 64 games (often with my late friend Justin Smith) using Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit: an early game development tool that let you build neat scrolling shooters without any programming knowledge.

ais

Adventures in Stupidity, one of my SEUCK creations

I used to upload my games to local BBSes in the New England area and wait for the response on the message boards. In the process, I downloaded some games made by a user known by the handle “MADMAN.”  Some of his games also used the moniker, “Dave the Madman.” He made seemingly professional quality games using Garry Kitchen’s Game Maker.  Not to be confused with YoYo’s GameMaker Studio.

Garry Kitchen’s Game Maker was an early game development tool published by Activision in 1985. I actually got it for my birthday in 1986, thinking that this was my key to becoming a superstar game designer. The thing is, Game Maker was a full blown programming language that, strangely, used the joystick to edit. It also included a sprite designer, music editor, and other tools. Everything a budding game developer would need to get started, right?

Although I did make a few simple games in Game Maker, its complexity was beyond my grasp at the time. Which is why Madman’s creations blew me away. They were so polished! He had developed so many completely different types of games! They all had cool graphics, animation, music, and effects I couldn’t figure out how to duplicate! My favorite was Space Rage: a sprawling, multi-screen space adventure that I simply could not comprehend. I had so many questions about how these games were made!

spacerage

SPACE RAGE!

We messaged each other on a local BBS. I blathered about how much of a fan I was of his work and he said he liked my games, too. I figured he was just being kind. After all, this was a MASTER saying this! We eventually exchanged phone numbers.

I have vague memories of talking to him on the phone, asking how he accomplished such amazing feats using Game Maker. I think he was a little older than me, but many of his games had a 1987 copyright date. Considering I was probably the same age at this time as he was in 1987, this made me feel quite inadequate.

As I recall, Madman was humble and didn’t have many aspirations beyond distributing his little games on BBSes. He seemed like a hobbyist that figured out Game Maker and really liked making games with it–nothing more, nothing less.

fatcat2

Fat Cat probably has the best animation of them all

After our call, he mailed me a complete collection of his games. A few years ago I found these floppy disks and copied them to my Mac using a 1541 transfer cable. The disks bear his handwriting, labeled “Madsoft” 1 – 4. I was able to rescue all of the disks, converting them to d64 format.

Playing through his creations was a real trip down memory lane. The most shocking thing I discovered is on the 2nd side of the 4th disk. His Archon-like game, Eliminators, features the text “Distributed by Atomic Revolution” on the bottom of the title screen. Atomic Revolution was a game ‘company’ I briefly formed with childhood friend, Cliff Bleszinski, around 1990 or so. It was a merger of sorts between my label, “Atomic Games”, and Cliff’s, “Revolution Games.” (The story about the C64 game he made in my parents’ basement is a whole other post!)

eliminators_title_2

An Atomic Revolution production?

I must have discussed handling the distribution of Eliminators with Dave; by uploading and promoting his awesome game all over the local BBS scene and sending them to mail-order shareware catalogs. At least that’s my best guess–I really have no recollection of how close we worked together. I must have done a terrible job since this game was almost completely lost to the mists of time.

I think we talked about meeting up and making a game together–but I didn’t even have my learner’s permit yet. On-line communication tools were primitive if they existed at all. We never really collaborated. I wonder what happened to “Dave the Madman” and his “Madsoft” empire? Is he even still alive? Did he go on to become a game developer, or at least a software engineer? Maybe he’ll somehow see this post and we’ll figure out the answer to this mystery!

ataxx

I remember he was most proud of his Ataxx homage

Until then, I’ll add the disk images of Madsoft 1-4 to this post. Check the games out, and let me know what you think. I’ve also put up some screenshots and videos of his various games–but I’m having problems finding a truly accurate C64 emulator for OSX. If anyone has any suggestions, let me know!

Here’s the link to the zip file. Check these games out for yourself!

 

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