Developing Applications for HoloLens with Unity3D: First Impressions

I started work on HoloLens game development with Unity3D over the past week. This included going through all of the example projects, as well as building simple games and applications to figure out how all of the platform’s features work.  Here’s a some takeaways from my first week as a HoloLens developer.

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Baby steps…

The Examples Are Great, But Lack Documentation

If you go through all of the Holo Academy examples Microsoft provides, you’ll go from displaying a basic cube to a full-blown multi user Augmented Reality experience. However, most of the examples involve dragging and dropping pre-made prefabs and scripts into the scene. Not a lot about the actual SDK is explained. The examples are a good way to get acquainted with HoloLens features, but you’re going to have to do more work to figure out how to write your own applications.

HoloToolkit is Incredibly Full Featured

All of the examples are based on HoloToolkit, Microsoft’s collection of scripts and prefabs that handle just about every major HoloLens application feature: input, spatial mapping, gesture detection, speech recognition, and even some networking.

I also found that features I needed (such as the placement of objects in the real world using real-time meshing as a collider) are features in the examples I could easily strip out and modify for my own C# scripts. Using these techniques I was able to get a very simple carnival milk bottle game running in a single Saturday afternoon.

Multiplayer Gets Complicated

I’m working on moving my award winning Tango RTS, InnAR Wars, to HoloLens. However, multiplayer experiences work much differently on HoloLens than Tango. In the case of Tango, each device shares a single room scan file and is localized in the same coordinate space. This means that once the game starts, placing an object (like a floating planet or asteroid) at any position will make it appear in the same real-world location on both Tangos.

HoloLens shares objects between devices using what are called Spatial Anchors. Spatial Anchors mark parts of the scanned room geometry as an anchored position. You can then place virtual objects in the real world relative to this anchor. When you share a Spatial Anchor with another device, the other HoloLens will look for a similar location in its own scan of the room to position the anchor. These anchors are constantly being updated as the scan continues, which is part of the trick to how HoloLens’ tracking is so rock solid.

Sure, having a single coordinate frame on the Tango is easier to deal with, but the Tango also suffers from drift and inaccuracies that may be symtomatic of its approach. Spatial Anchoring is a rather radical change from how Tango works–which means a lot of refactoring for InnAR Wars, or even a redesign.

First Week Down

This first week has been an enlightening experience. Progress has been fast but also made me aware of how much work it will be to produce a great HoloLens app. At least two independently published HoloLens games popped up in the Windows Store over the past few days. The race is on for the first great indie HoloLens application!

One thought on “Developing Applications for HoloLens with Unity3D: First Impressions

  1. Pingback: Debugging HoloLens Apps in Unity3D | Ralph Barbagallo's Self Indulgent Blog

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