How To Demo HoloLens Apps In Public

Last week’s VRLA Summer Expo was the first time the public got a look at my current HoloLens project, Ether Wars. Tons of people lined up to try it. I must have done well over 100 demos over the two day event. Since then, I’ve showed it to a variety of developers, executives, and investors ranging from zero experience to those who have used HoloLens quite a bit. Combined with all the demoing done at HoloHacks a few months ago, I’ve learned a lot of common sense tips when demoing mixed reality apps. I figured I’d sum up some of my presentation tricks here.

Know Your Space

HoloLens can be a very temperamental device. Although it features the most robust tracking I’ve ever seen with an AR headset, areas with a lot of moving objects (pets, crowds of people), featureless walls, windows, and mirrors can really mess things up. Also, rooms that are too dark or too bright can make the display look not so great.

If you are travelling somewhere to show your app, try to find out ahead of time what the room is like that you are demoing in. It might be possible to ask for a few alternative rooms if the space they’ve got you in is inappropriate.

And, how do you know if the space is inappropriate? Scan the room before the demo starts. In the case of Ether Wars, you have to scan the room before you play the game. This scan is saved, so subsequent games don’t have to go through that process. When I demo the game, I scan the room myself to make sure the room works before I let others use it. This not only lets me know if the room works but allows the rest of the users to skip this sometimes lengthy step.

Consider building demo-specific safety features. For instance, Ether Drift needs ceilings to spawn space stations from. In the case of a room with a vaulted ceiling the HoloLens can’t scan, a safety feature would be one that automatically spawns the bases at ceiling height for demo purposes.

Teach The Air Tap

Microsoft’s mantra for HoloLens the interfaces is “Gaze, Gesture, and Voice“-essentially a conroller-free interface for all HoloLens apps. Very cool in concept, but I find at least half the people who try the device can’t reliably perform the air tap. It’s a tricky and unnatural gesture. Most people want to reach out and poke the holograms with their finger. It takes quite a bit of explanation to teach users that they must aim with their head and perform that weird air tap motion to click on whatever is highlighted by the cursor.

airtap

Teach the user how to perform the air tap before the demo–perhaps by having them actually launch and pin the app on a wall. It might help to put a training exercise in the app itself. For instance, to start Ether Wars you have to gaze and air tap on a button to start the experience. I use this moment to teach the player how to navigate menus and use the air tap.

Worst case scenario, you can stick your arm over the player’s shoulder in view of the HoloLens and perform the air tap yourself if the user just can’t figure it out.

Check The Color Stack

Unlike VR, it’s difficult to see what the user is viewing when demoing a HoloLens app. You can get a live video preview from the Windows Device Portal. However, this can affect the speed and resolution of the app. Thus, degrading the performance of your demo. One trick I’ve used to figure out where the user currently is in the demo is to learn what the colors of the stacked display look like on different screens.

IMG_2687

Each layer of the display shows different colors

If you look at the side of the HoloLens display you’ll see a stack of colored lights. These colors change depending on what is being shown on the screen. By observing this while people are playing Ether Wars, I’ve learned to figure out what screen people are on based on how the lights look on the side of the device. Now I don’t have to annoyingly ask “what are you seeing right now” during the demo.

None of this is rocket science–just some tips and tricks I’ve learned while demoing Hololens projects over the past month or so. Let me know if you’ve got any others to add to the list.

2 thoughts on “How To Demo HoloLens Apps In Public

  1. How are you scanning and saving the scan from the environment? You are using Unity to do this right? I too am doing public demos with the Hololens and I’m having issues with the scene/objects drifting between different users trying the app. Ideally I can scan an environment in the show room before others arrive and then save that scan. So, do you have some tips or a code sample of how to trigger a scan, save it and then load it again on future launches?

    Thank you!

    • I’m not really doing anything–it seems that the scan is cached somehow already. I haven’t tired returning to the room later, but when restart the app right after scanning, the scan seems to already be there and progressively adds to it.

      Spatial Anchors are different issue I’ve had problems myself reloading them after I create them. They always seem off from their original position.

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