Kakao is the new Asian mobile gaming powerhouse

Kakao has leveraged their insanely popular mobile group messaging app, Kakao Talk, to launch a social gaming network called Game Center in Korea. This is similar to Tencent’s strategy of using their Chinese instant messaging network, QQ, to drive traffic to f2p PC games. Yet in the West, Apple’s iMessage seems to have killed off most group messaging startups, and the only one to pursue a gaming strategy released a tower defense game based on Shannon Tweed. No, really.

Kakao has successfully commissioned established game developers to produce high quality games for Game Center. The slickly produced Match-3 game, Anipang, recently rose to the top of the Korean App Store due to its use of Kakao Talk as a viral messaging channel. (It’s also available for Android) Encouraging users to message friends in order to get extra plays, Anipang uses social news update notifications similar to the early days of Facebook games to drive reach. Korean friends of mine have deleted the app from their iPhones to avoid the onslaught of game messages–reminiscent of the bad old days of “Lost Sheep” Farmville spam. Regardless, Kakao has mined a passionate and highly monetizable social network of gamers from Kakao Talk.

With over 55 million users, Kakao may eclipse the size of DeNA’s Mobage platform. It remains to be seen what their plans for the US are. Although Game Center will probably have to be renamed before it launches in the West. I hear Apple can be quite litigious when it comes to their intellectual property.

Come to my session next week at Austin GDC

By the way…On Wednesday, October 10th at 5:35 PM at Austin GDC come see my talk on cross-platform Unity3D mobile games development. Hey, it’s only 25 minutes long. How bad can it be?

Detecting Android Tablets and Phones in Unity3D

There’s been a few cases when I’ve needed to know whether one of my apps is running on an Android phone or a tablet. With Camera Birds’ gyro virtual camera, I encountered the fact that orientations are flipped differently on Android tablets and phones. By default, an Android tablet’s “natural” orientation is landscape, while a phone is portrait. This means that a 90 degree rotation is landscape on a phone, while on a tablet this becomes portrait. Get it? Neither do I. It’s another supremely awful decision that is simply par for the course with Android.

I ended up adapting a method from a Stack Overflow post used to determine natural orientation. I wrote it with Unity3D’s ability to access Android’s Java classes via the AndroidJavaClass object. This is a great feature of Unity3D that allows you to access the Android API through JNI without having to write a native plug-in.

The code is here. With this, you can tell if you are running on a tablet or a phone by checking for the natural orientation: landscape on a tablet, portrait on a phone. Even if you don’t need to flip gyro rotations, you might want to do this to separate tablet ad units from phone ads, for instance.

Android Users Are Apathetic

I launched the virtual pets spoof, Brick Buddies, on Android and iOS last month with zero PR. It was a crazy idea I wanted to make for no particular reason. Since both versions were launched with the same minimal PR effort (a mere tweet and a Facebook post), I figured I’d use this as an opportunity to analyze both platforms from a new perspective.

The top line: Brick Buddies on iOS gets 10X the downloads of the Android version. I got more iOS downloads in the first day than I did in 3 weeks on Google Play. Although both versions have earned a pittance, iOS users spend more money too.

Brick Buddies’ iOS release got picked up as a news story on at least 3 websites, including The Guardian, with no PR. I saw far more Facebook likes, shares, and retweets about Brick Buddies on iOS through my social graph than the Android release.

But wait, isn’t Android beating iOS in market share?

Pondering this, I thought about everyone I know that has an Android phone. They are my friends least into mobile tech. When I get a peek at their home screen, they hardly have any apps installed. They are seemingly content to have a slick-looking phone with a giant screen that makes calls and sends messages. iPhone users (myself included) appear to be platform zealots and voracious consumers of apps.

I had a hunch that most Android users just aren’t into their phones–which makes sense. If you aren’t into mobile tech, you’d probably settle for an Android device. Let’s face it–Aside from the Google ‘pure’ handsets, most really aren’t so great.

I put a survey up on Mechanical Turk to unscientifically poll the public about the habits of iPhone and Android users. I wanted to see how they like their phones and how excited they are about apps. I only got about 200 responses, so this really isn’t statistically significant.

Hey–it’s good fodder for an inflammatory linkbait post about Android users! Here are some results:

WHO ARE ANDROID USERS?

Both Android and iOS had the same ratio of men to women users.

My results supported what I’ve heard from other studies–Android users trend younger than on the iPhone. 60.6% of Android users polled were under 29 as opposed to 47.3% of iPhone users.

Android users trend younger than iPhone

Android users also reported lower incomes and education levels than iPhone users. Not that this is relevant information–Unless you are an Instagram snob.

ANDROID USERS SEEM LESS SATISFIED WITH THEIR PHONE

When asked if they would buy the same kind of phone again, 89.3% of iPhone users said yes, while 78.9% of Android users did. Android owners also seem a little less satisfied with their phone when asked–89.2% of iPhone users were satisfied or extremely satisfied with their devices versus 81.7% for Android.

ANDROID USERS DON’T CARE ABOUT APPS

A chart showing the app recommendation habits of iPhone and Android users.

Android users seem less likely to blab about apps to their friends.

Android users seem slightly less likely to recommend apps to friends, with 37.5% of iPhone users recommending apps to friends often or extremely often and only 19.7% for Android. Hey, Android users just aren’t into apps–why talk about them?

Nearly 43% of iPhone users reported using apps extremely often, compared to 31% of Android owners.

ANDROID USERS ARE CHEAPSKATES

Android vs. iPhone users: Have you paid for an app?

iPhone users pay for apps, Android users don't.

Although the vast majority of Android and iPhone users have downloaded free apps, only 47.5% of Android users have ever paid to download an app vs. 80.4% of iPhone users. Also, 77.5% of Android users reported never having made an in app purchase in a freemium game versus 58.9% of iPhone owners. Hey, it’s been said before.

CONCLUSION

This data is based on too small a sample to really make a conclusion. I still think it’s decent data to expand on my hunch–Android users just aren’t into apps. This presents a marketing challenge. Android users are out there, but how do you get them excited about your content?

According to this final chart, users of both platforms look for information about apps in similar places.

Info sources for new apps ranked by popularity for Android and iPhone users

Android and iPhone users have similar tastes as far as info sources for new apps.

The audience exists. Perhaps you have to address them differently in the same channels.

Some developers seemed to have cracked this code. For most, monetizing apathetic Android users remains a challenge.