My Favorite VR Experiences So Far

Now that I’ve had plenty of time to go through the launch content of both Oculus and Vive, I figured I’d highlight my favorite experiences you can try for both devices instead of a typical product review. Many of these games are available for both platforms, while some are exclusive.


My Retail Vive Finally Arrived!

Adr1ft (Oculus)

This is the flagship release for Oculus and deservedly so. Although not a pure VR experience (it also works as a standard game), it’s an absolutely wild trip in VR. Billed as a First Person Experience (FPX), it ranks somewhere between a walking simulator like Firewatch and an adventure such as Bioshock on the “Is It a Game?” scale.

This is consistently one of the top-selling Oculus titles, yet ranks near the bottom on comfort. I had no nausea issues at all, but I generally don’t feel uncomfortable in most VR games. I can see how free-floating in zero gravity, desperately grasping at oxygen canisters as you slowly suffocate to death inside a claustrophobic space suit can cause issues with those prone to simulation sickness. Regardless, this shows that it pays to be hardcore when making VR experiences–especially at this early adopter stage of the market.

A stunning debut for Adam Orth’s threeonezero studio.

Firma (Oculus)

This perhaps one of my absolute favorite pure VR games so far. Think Lunar Lander, Space Taxi or Thrust in VR. If this was a standard video game, it would be mundane, but as a VR experience I really do feel like I have a job piloting a tiny lander craft on a desolate moon base. It actually sort of achieves presence for me–but not the feeling of being in another reality…more like being in an ‘80s sci-fi movie.

Originally available via Oculus Share for years–it’s obvious that a lot of work has been put into this game to get it here for the commercial Oculus release. There are tons of missions, great voice acting, and a lot of fun mechanics and scenarios. This game is giving me plenty of ideas on how to adapt my old Ludum Dare game to VR.

Strangely, this game is in Oculus’ Early Access section, even though I consider it a complete game.

The Apollo 11 Virtual Reality Experience (Oculus, Vive)

An astounding educational journey through America’s moon landing told via VR. This is better than any field trip I took as a kid to the Boston Museum of Science, that’s for sure. This is just the tip of the spear when it comes to education and VR.

Hover Junkers (Vive)

Hover Junkers requires the most physical activity out of any VR game I’ve played–So much so that after 20 minutes of shooting, cowering behind my hovercraft’s hull for cover, and frantically speeding around post-apocalyptic landscapes, my Vive was soaked in sweat. One thing is for sure, public VR arcades are going to need some kind of solution to keep these headsets sanitary. Hover Junkers certainly is the most exciting multiplayer experience I’ve had in VR so far.

Budget Cuts (Vive)

The absolute best example of room scale VR. I didn’t really get it when watching the videos, but when I was finally able to try the demo on my own Vive….wow. This is the game I let everyone try when they first experience Vive. It really nails the difference between seated, controller-based VR and a room scale hand-tracked experience. This is the first “real game” I’ve played that uses all of these elements. So many firsts here, and done so well.

The past month has been a very encouraging start for VR. At this early stage there are already several games that give me that “just one more try” lure. This is surprising given that many current VR titles are small in scope, and in some cases partially-finished early access experiences. With the launch of PSVR later this year, we’re sure to see more full-sized VR games…whatever that means.

The Beginner’s Guide: Dave the Madman Edition

I recently played The Beginner’s Guide after buying it during the annual Holiday Steam Sale over the break. It’s a quick play through, and an interesting way to tell a story within a game. Without giving too much away, the experience reminded me of a similar event in my young-adulthood–When I encountered an amazing game developer who created incredible works I couldn’t hope to match. I’ve since forgotten his real name and don’t know much about him.  But I do have the 4 double-sided floppy disks he sent me of all his games at the time.


Madsoft 1-4, recovered in great condition

This was the early ‘90s–I’d say around 1990-1991. I had made a bunch of Commodore 64 games (often with my late friend Justin Smith) using Shoot ‘Em Up Construction Kit: an early game development tool that let you build neat scrolling shooters without any programming knowledge.


Adventures in Stupidity, one of my SEUCK creations

I used to upload my games to local BBSes in the New England area and wait for the response on the message boards. In the process, I downloaded some games made by a user known by the handle “MADMAN.”  Some of his games also used the moniker, “Dave the Madman.” He made seemingly professional quality games using Garry Kitchen’s Game Maker.  Not to be confused with YoYo’s GameMaker Studio.

Garry Kitchen’s Game Maker was an early game development tool published by Activision in 1985. I actually got it for my birthday in 1986, thinking that this was my key to becoming a superstar game designer. The thing is, Game Maker was a full blown programming language that, strangely, used the joystick to edit. It also included a sprite designer, music editor, and other tools. Everything a budding game developer would need to get started, right?

Although I did make a few simple games in Game Maker, its complexity was beyond my grasp at the time. Which is why Madman’s creations blew me away. They were so polished! He had developed so many completely different types of games! They all had cool graphics, animation, music, and effects I couldn’t figure out how to duplicate! My favorite was Space Rage: a sprawling, multi-screen space adventure that I simply could not comprehend. I had so many questions about how these games were made!



We messaged each other on a local BBS. I blathered about how much of a fan I was of his work and he said he liked my games, too. I figured he was just being kind. After all, this was a MASTER saying this! We eventually exchanged phone numbers.

I have vague memories of talking to him on the phone, asking how he accomplished such amazing feats using Game Maker. I think he was a little older than me, but many of his games had a 1987 copyright date. Considering I was probably the same age at this time as he was in 1987, this made me feel quite inadequate.

As I recall, Madman was humble and didn’t have many aspirations beyond distributing his little games on BBSes. He seemed like a hobbyist that figured out Game Maker and really liked making games with it–nothing more, nothing less.


Fat Cat probably has the best animation of them all

After our call, he mailed me a complete collection of his games. A few years ago I found these floppy disks and copied them to my Mac using a 1541 transfer cable. The disks bear his handwriting, labeled “Madsoft” 1 – 4. I was able to rescue all of the disks, converting them to d64 format.

Playing through his creations was a real trip down memory lane. The most shocking thing I discovered is on the 2nd side of the 4th disk. His Archon-like game, Eliminators, features the text “Distributed by Atomic Revolution” on the bottom of the title screen. Atomic Revolution was a game ‘company’ I briefly formed with childhood friend, Cliff Bleszinski, around 1990 or so. It was a merger of sorts between my label, “Atomic Games”, and Cliff’s, “Revolution Games.” (The story about the C64 game he made in my parents’ basement is a whole other post!)


An Atomic Revolution production?

I must have discussed handling the distribution of Eliminators with Dave; by uploading and promoting his awesome game all over the local BBS scene and sending them to mail-order shareware catalogs. At least that’s my best guess–I really have no recollection of how close we worked together. I must have done a terrible job since this game was almost completely lost to the mists of time.

I think we talked about meeting up and making a game together–but I didn’t even have my learner’s permit yet. On-line communication tools were primitive if they existed at all. We never really collaborated. I wonder what happened to “Dave the Madman” and his “Madsoft” empire? Is he even still alive? Did he go on to become a game developer, or at least a software engineer? Maybe he’ll somehow see this post and we’ll figure out the answer to this mystery!


I remember he was most proud of his Ataxx homage

Until then, I’ll add the disk images of Madsoft 1-4 to this post. Check the games out, and let me know what you think. I’ve also put up some screenshots and videos of his various games–but I’m having problems finding a truly accurate C64 emulator for OSX. If anyone has any suggestions, let me know!

Here’s the link to the zip file. Check these games out for yourself!


My Week With Project Tango

A few weeks back I got into Google’s exclusive Project Tango developers program. I’ve had a Tango tablet for about a week and have been experimenting with the available apps and Unity3D SDK.

Project Tango uses Movidius’ Myriad 1 Vision Processor chip (or “VPU”), paired with a depth camera not too unlike the original Kinect for the XBOX 360. Except instead of being a giant hideous block, it’s small enough to stick in a phone or tablet.

I’m excited about Tango because it’s an important step in solving many of the problems I have with current Augmented Reality technology. What issues can Tango solve?


First, the Tango tablet has the ability to determine the tablet’s pose. Sure, pretty much every mobile device out there can detect its precise orientation by fusing together compass and gyro information. But by using the Tango’s array of sensors, the Myriad 1 processor can detect position and translation. You can walk around with the tablet and it knows how far and where you’ve moved. This makes SLAM algorithms much easier to develop and more precise than strictly optical solutions.

Also, another problem with AR as it exists now is that there’s no way to know whether you or the image target moved. Rendering-wise, there’s no difference. But, this poses a problem with game physics. If you smash your head (while wearing AR glasses) into a virtual box, the box should go flying. If the box is thrown at you, it should bounce off your head–big distinction!

Pose and position tracking has the potential to factor out the user’s movement and determine the motion of both the observer and the objects that are being tracked. This can then be fed into a game engine’s physics system to get accurate physics interactions between the observer and virtual objects.


Anyway, that’s kind of an esoteric problem. The biggest issue with AR is most solutions can only overlay graphics on top of a scene. As you can see in my Ether Drift project, the characters appear on top of specially designed trading cards. However, wave your hand in front of the characters, and they will still draw on top of everything.

Ether Drift uses Vuforia to superimpose virtual characters on top of trading cards.

Ether Drift uses Vuforia to superimpose virtual characters on top of trading cards.

With Tango, it is possible to reconstruct the 3D geometry of your surroundings using point cloud data received from the depth camera. Matterport already has an impressive demo of this running on the Tango. It allows the user to scan an area with the tablet (very slowly) and it will build a textured mesh out of what it sees. When meshing is turned off the tablet can detect precisely where it is in the saved environment mesh.

This geometry can possibly be used in Unity3D as a mesh collider which is also rendered to the depth buffer of the scene’s camera while displaying the tablet camera’s video feed. This means superimposed augmented reality characters can accurately collide with the static environment, as well as be occluded by real world objects. Characters can now not only appear on top of your table, but behind it–obscured by a chair leg.


Finally, this solves the challenge of how to properly light AR objects. Most AR apps assume there’s a light source on the ceiling and place a directional light pointing down. With a mesh built from local point cloud data, you can generate a panoramic render of where the observer is standing in the real world. This image can be used as a cube map for Image-based lighting systems like Marmoset Skyshop. This produces accurate lighting on 3D objects which when combined with environmental occlusion makes this truly a next generation AR experience.


The first thing I did with the Unity SDK is drop the Tango camera in a Camera Birds scene. One of the most common requests for Camera Birds was to be able to walk through the forest instead of just rotating in place. It took no programming at all for me to make this happen with Tango.

This technology still has a long way to go–it has to become faster and more precise. Luckily, Movidius has already produced the Myriad 2, which is reportedly 3-5X faster and 20X more power efficient than the chip currently in the Tango prototypes. Vision Processing technology is a supremely nerdy topic–after all it’s literally rocket science. But it has far reaching implications for wearable platforms.

A Weekend at Oculus Connect

I spent this past weekend at Oculus Connect and have just now had the time to process what I saw. For Oculus to go from a humble Kickstarter project a few years ago to a capacity filled conference rife with amazing demos and prototypes by countless developers is mind-boggling. I know I said VR in 2014 is like Mobile in 2002, but the pace of progress is staggering. The maturation path for VR is going to be MUCH quicker. Is it 2005 already?

...and all I got was this lousy t-shirt.

…and all I got was this lousy t-shirt.

As I stated before, Gear VR is the most important wearable platform in the universe. I’ve been developing Gear VR games for a while and am thoroughly convinced this wireless, lightweight platform will have far more reach than VR tethered to your desktop.

The GearVR demo area.

The GearVR demo area.

The apps on display were great, but I even saw a few Gear VR demos from random developers in the hotel hallways that blew away what were officially shown in Samsung’s display area. Developer interest for Gear VR is very high. Once it’s commercially available, a flood of content is soon upon us.

Despite the intense interest in the platform, I spoke to a few desktop and console developers who dismissed Gear VR as a distraction and are ignoring it–which I think is really short-sighted.

It’s true that there may be a division in audiences. Gear VR may be the larger, casual audience while apps built around Oculus’ astounding Crescent Bay platform could be for a highly monetizable market of core enthusiasts. Either route is smart business. Depending on how long you can hold out for customer traction, that is.

Oh, and Crescent Bay…was a revolution. There’s probably not much more to be said about it that hasn’t already–but the ridiculous momentum behind Oculus’ path from the DK1 to Crescent Bay makes me question the competition. Oculus has hired all of the smartest people I know and have billions of dollars to spend on VR R&D–which is their main business, not a side project. Will competitors like Sony really commit enough resources to compete with the relentless pace of Oculus’ progress?

Why Consoles Didn’t Die

Yeah I was wrong. But hey, so were a lot of people. The PS4 barrels ahead with the fastest selling console ever. Microsoft is making a lot of similar but highly qualified statements about the XBOX One which leads me to believe it’s lagging behind significantly. Still, the recent European price cut and upcoming tent pole releases may perk things up.

photo (39)

Regardless, most console doom predictions haven’t come true. This is because Microsoft, and primarily Sony, changed their business models in response to the looming threat from mobile and tablets. If consoles kept going the direction they were in 2008, we would see a totally different story.

What changed?

No more loss leaders.

Consoles historically launched as high-end hardware sold at a loss–but still quite expensive. This peaked last generation with the ‘aspirational’ PS3 debuting at nearly $600 in 2006. The idea behind this business model was that they’d make it up in software sales and eventually cost reduce the hardware.

This time, Sony took a page out of Nintendo’s book and built lower cost hardware that can at least be sold close to breakeven at launch. The downside being that the tech specs are somewhat mundane. Price sensitivity wins over performance.

Dropping the gates.

The tightly gated ecosystem that dominated consoles for decades would have been absolutely disastrous if left to stand. Sony has largely obliterated their gate and gone for a more authoritarian version of Apple’s curated model. Surely the most significant evidence of mobile’s influence on console to date. Microsoft has also adopted this posture with their ID program. The indie revolution is heavily influencing games, and allowing this movement to continue on consoles is a smart move. Especially when fewer and fewer studios can execute at a AAA level.

Users didn’t move.

A lot of analysts mistook stagnant console numbers for lagging demand. It turns out, there really was just nothing else to buy. Despite hype about core games on mobile–that transition has yet to happen. Most titles console players would recognize as ‘core’ games have utterly failed to gain traction on tablets. Core gamers want core games exclusively on console or desktop while reserving mobile for a completely different experience.

Eventually we’ll see a major disruption in how and where games are consumed. It’s going to take longer than one console generation to transform core gamer habits. It also may be too early to tell. After all, we’re only a few months into this generation.

The fact is, the AAA economy isn’t sustainable. Massive layoffs, even while Sony is basking in post-hardware launch success, shows not all is well with the AAA end of the spectrum.

From Bits to Atoms: Creating A Game In The Physical World

Some of you may recall last year’s post about 3D printing and my general disappointment with consumer-grade additive manufacturing technology. This was the start of my year-long quest to turn bits into atoms. Since that time there has been much progress in the technology and I’ve learned a lot about manufacturing. But first, a little about why I’m doing this, and my new project titled: Ether Drift.

Ether Drift AR App

A little over a year ago, I met a small team of developers who had a jaw-dropping trailer for a property they tried to get funded as a AAA console game. After failing to get the game off the ground it was mothballed until I accidentally saw their video one fateful afternoon.

With the incredible success of wargaming miniatures and miniature-based board game campaigns on Kickstarter, I thought one way to launch this awesome concept would be to turn the existing game assets into figurines. These toys would work with an augmented reality app that introduces the world and the characters as well as light gameplay elements. This would be a way to gauge interest in the property before going ahead with a full game production.

A lot of this was based on my erroneous assumption that I could just 3D print game models and ship them as toys. I really knew nothing about manufacturing. Vague memories of Ed Fries’ 3D printing service that made figurines out of World of Warcraft avatars guided my first steps.

3D printers are great prototyping tools. Still, printing the existing game model took over 20 hours and cost hundreds of dollars in materials and machine time. Plus, 3D prints are fragile and require a lot of hand-finishing to smooth out. When manufacturing in quantity, you need to go back to old-school molding.

You can 3D print just about any shape, but molding and casting has strict limitations. You have to minimize undercut by breaking the model up into smaller pieces that can be molded and assembled. The game model I printed out was way too complicated to be broken down into a manageable set of parts.

Most of these little bits on the back and underside would have to be individual molded parts to be re-assembled later--An expensive process!

Most of these little bits on the back and underside would have to be individual molded parts to be re-assembled later–An expensive process!

So I scrapped the idea of using an existing game property. Instead, I developed an entirely new production process. I now create new characters from scratch that are designed to be molded. This starts as a high detail 3D model that is printed out in parts that molds are made from. Then, I have that 3D model turned into something that can be textured and rigged for Unity3D. There are some sacrifices made in character design since the more pieces there are, the more expensive it is to manufacture. Same goes for the painting process–the more detailed the game texture is, the more costly it becomes to duplicate in paint on a plastic toy.

We're working on getting a simple paint job that matches the in-game texture.

We’re working on getting a simple paint job that matches the in-game texture.

So, what is Ether Drift? In short: it’s Skylanders for nerds. I love the concept of Skylanders–but, grown adult geeks like toys too. The first version of this project features a limited set of figures and an augmented reality companion app.

The app uses augmented reality trading cards packed with each figure to display your toy in real-time 3D as well as allowing you to use your characters with a simple card battle game. I’m using Qualcomm’s Vuforia for this feature–the gold standard in AR.

The app lets you add characters to your collection via a unique code on the card. These characters will be available in the eventual Ether Drift game, as well as others. I’ve secured a deal to have these characters available in at least one other game.

If you are building a new IP today, it’s extremely important to think about your physical goods strategy. Smart indies have already figured this out. The workflow I created for physical to digital can be applied to any IP, but planning it in advance can make the process much simpler.

In essence, I’m financing the development of a new IP by selling individual assets as toys while it is being built. For me, it’s also a throwback to the days before everything was licensed from movies or comic books and toy store shelves were stocked with all kinds of crazy stuff. Will it work? We’ll see next month! I am planning a Kickstarter for the first series in mid-March. Stay Tuned to the Ether Drift site, Facebook page, or Twitter account. Selling atoms instead of bits is totally new ground for me. I’m open to all feedback on the project, as well as people who want to collaborate.

How to survive the mobile gaming apocalypse

I was listening to the latest Walled Garden podcast and towards the end they stopped just short of stating what many developers I talk to have been saying–mobile gaming is dead.

Ok, not actually dead. After all, mobile gaming revenue is higher than it’s ever been, and mobile consumption of everything is eating the planet. However, mobile gaming is completely dead as a business model for independent developers and undercapitalized startups.

IAP has become so dominant that there’s really only one somewhat reproducible way to make money in the AppStore: make a hamster wheel f2p game in a handful of established genres and spend tens of thousands of dollars a day on user acquisition to drive traffic to it. Despite many bold experiments, the charts increasingly bear this out.


This means that some companies with top charting mobile games aren’t actually making a profit as UA costs can eat up most of the revenue. Surely this will produce a shakeout and consolidation in 2014. This is similar to what happened to Facebook games circa 2010 causing a mass exodus to mobile.

Now that mobile is dead, where should you escape to? There are several options.


The PC, and more specifically Steam, remains the platform of choice for those who actually want to charge money for content. There’s a large market for premium games and Steam has loosened their gate with the advent of Greenlight. Some prominent developers have been abandoning mobile for PC with their new projects. Despite PC sales declining in the face of tablets, it makes sense. This is where the paying customers are.


A lot has been written here about the impending demise of consoles, but Sony and Microsoft managed to change up their business model and product strategy enough to have early success with both the PS4 and XBOX One. One of the big changes has been the thawing of the gated ecosystem and allowing independent developers to self-publish. Oh yeah, and on the Wii U also.

Next generation console owners are starved for content. There will be many independent successes over the next few years before the channel becomes completely saturated.


On one hand VR is merely a peripheral for existing games, on the other it’s part of an entirely new category of wearable computing and an emerging platform. Oculus Rift is the clear leader with a huge round of investment and development kits widespread. However a glut of VR headsets is on the horizon.

Oculus is building an ecosystem out of their device, but VR content can be distributed through any PC gaming channel. Although, supporting every single headset may be a nightmare for developers–isn’t it time for some kind of standard VR API?

Board games

Board games are a cottage industry yet a hot category on Kickstarter. As an example, Sandy Peteresen’s Cuthulu World Combat iOS game Kickstarter failed miserably, but when re-pitched as a board game, it blew past its funding goal. Going from digital to physical presents a lot of new challenges for developers, but does have a dedicated fan base of paying customers. Plus, you can’t pirate a board game!

Facebook / Web

Facebook games ‘died’ in 2010, but are ironically becoming an increasingly common alternative platform for mobile developers. Especially if you have a working web client already, why not put it on Facebook? The problem is the audience is decidedly non-hardcore. Facebook games can still make some money, but for a very specific audience. However, for hardcore games, the open web still remains a viable place to find an audience of paying gamers. Kongregate proves this.

What needs to change in mobile?

The supremacy of f2p and the very few options for user acquisition make the momentum towards free and the companies with enough money to compete in the mobile UA wars insurmountable. Apple could make some changes to the App Store to help support premium games and other alternative business models, however there really isn’t any incentive to do so–Either way, Apple sells phones. It’s difficult to foresee anything but the continuing dominance of f2p and mega-publishers on mobile in 2014. If you have a ton of cash and resources, solving this problem is hard, and thus very lucrative. For the rest of us, plan your strategy accordingly.