My Favorite VR Experiences So Far

Now that I’ve had plenty of time to go through the launch content of both Oculus and Vive, I figured I’d highlight my favorite experiences you can try for both devices instead of a typical product review. Many of these games are available for both platforms, while some are exclusive.


My Retail Vive Finally Arrived!

Adr1ft (Oculus)

This is the flagship release for Oculus and deservedly so. Although not a pure VR experience (it also works as a standard game), it’s an absolutely wild trip in VR. Billed as a First Person Experience (FPX), it ranks somewhere between a walking simulator like Firewatch and an adventure such as Bioshock on the “Is It a Game?” scale.

This is consistently one of the top-selling Oculus titles, yet ranks near the bottom on comfort. I had no nausea issues at all, but I generally don’t feel uncomfortable in most VR games. I can see how free-floating in zero gravity, desperately grasping at oxygen canisters as you slowly suffocate to death inside a claustrophobic space suit can cause issues with those prone to simulation sickness. Regardless, this shows that it pays to be hardcore when making VR experiences–especially at this early adopter stage of the market.

A stunning debut for Adam Orth’s threeonezero studio.

Firma (Oculus)

This perhaps one of my absolute favorite pure VR games so far. Think Lunar Lander, Space Taxi or Thrust in VR. If this was a standard video game, it would be mundane, but as a VR experience I really do feel like I have a job piloting a tiny lander craft on a desolate moon base. It actually sort of achieves presence for me–but not the feeling of being in another reality…more like being in an ‘80s sci-fi movie.

Originally available via Oculus Share for years–it’s obvious that a lot of work has been put into this game to get it here for the commercial Oculus release. There are tons of missions, great voice acting, and a lot of fun mechanics and scenarios. This game is giving me plenty of ideas on how to adapt my old Ludum Dare game to VR.

Strangely, this game is in Oculus’ Early Access section, even though I consider it a complete game.

The Apollo 11 Virtual Reality Experience (Oculus, Vive)

An astounding educational journey through America’s moon landing told via VR. This is better than any field trip I took as a kid to the Boston Museum of Science, that’s for sure. This is just the tip of the spear when it comes to education and VR.

Hover Junkers (Vive)

Hover Junkers requires the most physical activity out of any VR game I’ve played–So much so that after 20 minutes of shooting, cowering behind my hovercraft’s hull for cover, and frantically speeding around post-apocalyptic landscapes, my Vive was soaked in sweat. One thing is for sure, public VR arcades are going to need some kind of solution to keep these headsets sanitary. Hover Junkers certainly is the most exciting multiplayer experience I’ve had in VR so far.

Budget Cuts (Vive)

The absolute best example of room scale VR. I didn’t really get it when watching the videos, but when I was finally able to try the demo on my own Vive….wow. This is the game I let everyone try when they first experience Vive. It really nails the difference between seated, controller-based VR and a room scale hand-tracked experience. This is the first “real game” I’ve played that uses all of these elements. So many firsts here, and done so well.

The past month has been a very encouraging start for VR. At this early stage there are already several games that give me that “just one more try” lure. This is surprising given that many current VR titles are small in scope, and in some cases partially-finished early access experiences. With the launch of PSVR later this year, we’re sure to see more full-sized VR games…whatever that means.

The Basics of Hand Tracked VR Input Design

Ever since my revelation at Oculus Connect I’ve been working on a project using hand tracking and VR. For now, it’s using my recently acquired Vive devkit. However, I’ve been researching design techniques for PSVR and Oculus Touch to keep the experience portable across many different hand tracking input schemes. Hand tracking has presented a few new problems to solve, similar to my initial adventures in head tracking interfaces.

The Vive's hand controller

Look Ma, No Hands!

The first problem I came across when designing an application that works on both Vive and Oculus Touch is the representation of your hands in VR. With Oculus Touch, most applications feature a pair of “ghost hands” that mimic the current pose of your hands and fingers. Since Oculus’ controllers can track your thumb and first two fingers, and presumably the rest are gripped around the handle, these ghost hands tend to accurately represent what your hands are doing in real life.

Oculus Touch controller

This metaphor breaks down with Vive as it doesn’t track your hands, but the position of the rod-like controllers you are holding. Vive games I’ve tried that show your hands end up feeling like waving around hands on a stick–there’s a definite disconnect between the visual of your hands in VR and where your brain thinks they are in real life. PSVR has this problem as well, as the Move controllers used with the current devkit are similar to Vive’s controllers.

You can alleviate this somewhat. Because there is a natural way most users tend to grip Move and Vive controllers, you can model and position the “hand on a stick” in the most likely way the controllers are gripped. This can make static hands in VR more convincing.

In any case, you have a few problems when you grab an object.

For Oculus, the act of grabbing is somewhat natural–you can clench your first two fingers and thumb into a “grab” type motion to pick something up. In the case of Bullet Train, this is how you pick up guns. The translucent representation of your hands means you can still see your hand pose and the gripped object at the same time. There’s not much to think about other than where you attach the held object to the hand model.

It also helps that in Bullet Train the objects you can grab have obvious handles and holding points. You can pose the hand to match the most likely hand position on a grabbed object without breaking immersion.

With Vive and PSVR you have a problem if you are using the “hand on a stick” technique. When you “grab” a virtual object by pressing the trigger, how do you show the hand holding something? It seems like the best answer is, you don’t! Check this video of Uber Entertainment’s awesome Wayward Sky PSVR demo:

Notice anything? When you grab something, the hand disappears. All you can see is the held object floating around in front of you.

This is a great solution for holding arbitrary shaped items because you don’t have to create a potentially infinite amount of hand grip animations. Because the user isn’t really grabbing anything and is instead clicking a trigger on a controller, there is no “real” grip position for your hand anyway. You also don’t have the problem of parts of the hands intersecting with the held object.

This isn’t a new technique. In fact, one of the earliest Vive demos, Job Simulator, does the exact same thing. Your brain fills in the gaps and it feels so natural that I just never noticed it!

Virtual Objects, Real Boundaries

The next problem I encountered is what do you do when your hand passes through virtual objects, but the objects can’t? For instance, you can be holding an object, and physically move your real, tracked hand through a virtual wall. The held object, bound by the engine’s physics simulation, will hit the wall while your hand continues to drag it through. Chaos erupts!

You can turn off collisions while an object is held, but what fun is that? You want to be able to knock things over and otherwise interact with the world while holding stuff. Plus, what happens when you let go of an object while inside a collision volume?

What I ended up doing is making the object detach, or fall out of your virtual hand, as soon as it hits something else. You can tweak this by making collisions with smaller, non-static objects less likely to detach the held object since they will be pushed around by your hand.

For most VR developers these are the first two things you encounter when designing and experience for hand-tracking VR systems. It seems Oculus Touch makes a lot of these problems go away, but we’ve just scratched the surface of the issues needed to be solved when your real hands interact with a virtual world.

Why I’m All In On Mobile VR

Last month I released Caldera Defense, a Virtual Reality tower defense game on Gear VR. This is the second Gear VR title I’ve worked on, and the first I’ve built and published from the ground up. (Not including my Oculus Mobile VR Jam submission) Caldera Defense is a free early access demo–basically a proof of concept of the full game–and the reaction has been great. Thousands of people have downloaded, rated, and given us valuable feedback. We’re busy incorporating it into the first update.

Caldera Defense featured on the Gear VR store

Originally I planned to use this as a demo to fund an expanded PC and Morpheus launch version of the game with greatly improved graphics, hours of gameplay, and additional features such as multiplayer and second-screen options.

However, pitching even a modestly budgeted console and PC VR game experience to publishers, or even the platforms themselves, is a tough sell. I’m sure at E3 next month we will see all sorts of AAA VR announcements. Yet, many traditional funding avenues for games remain skeptical of the opportunity VR presents.

Since the Caldera project began last year, mobile VR has morphed into a unique opportunity. With over a million Google Cardboards in the wild and new versions of the Gear VR headset in retail stores worldwide, there will be millions of mobile VR users before there’s comparable numbers on Oculus desktop, Vive, and Morpheus.

Is it possible that mobile VR will be a viable business before it is on PC and consoles? Most of my colleagues are skeptical. I’m not.

The economics work out. Due to the mobile nature of the experience, games and apps for these platforms tend towards the bite-sized. This greatly reduces the risk of mobile VR since assets optimized for mobile are simpler and casual VR experiences require less content to be built overall.

I can make a dozen mobile VR minimum viable products for the same budget of one modestly scoped Morpheus experience. From these MVPs I can determine what types of content gains the most traction with VR users and move in that direction. I can even use this data to guide development of larger AAA VR experiences later.

By this time next year it will be possible to monetize these users significantly, whether through premium content or advertising. It may be more valuable to collect a lot of eyeballs in mobile VR than breaking even on a multi-million dollar AAA launch tile. As we’ve seen in the past, acquiring a huge audience of mobile players can lead to tremendous revenue streams.

Being on the Oculus desktop, Vive, or Sony’s Morpheus deck at launch is an enormous opportunity. In fact, I’m still searching for ways to produce the console and desktop version of Caldera Defense. However, if you lack the capital to produce at that scale, smaller mobile projects are much easier to bootstrap and the upside is huge.

Why Consoles Didn’t Die

Yeah I was wrong. But hey, so were a lot of people. The PS4 barrels ahead with the fastest selling console ever. Microsoft is making a lot of similar but highly qualified statements about the XBOX One which leads me to believe it’s lagging behind significantly. Still, the recent European price cut and upcoming tent pole releases may perk things up.

photo (39)

Regardless, most console doom predictions haven’t come true. This is because Microsoft, and primarily Sony, changed their business models in response to the looming threat from mobile and tablets. If consoles kept going the direction they were in 2008, we would see a totally different story.

What changed?

No more loss leaders.

Consoles historically launched as high-end hardware sold at a loss–but still quite expensive. This peaked last generation with the ‘aspirational’ PS3 debuting at nearly $600 in 2006. The idea behind this business model was that they’d make it up in software sales and eventually cost reduce the hardware.

This time, Sony took a page out of Nintendo’s book and built lower cost hardware that can at least be sold close to breakeven at launch. The downside being that the tech specs are somewhat mundane. Price sensitivity wins over performance.

Dropping the gates.

The tightly gated ecosystem that dominated consoles for decades would have been absolutely disastrous if left to stand. Sony has largely obliterated their gate and gone for a more authoritarian version of Apple’s curated model. Surely the most significant evidence of mobile’s influence on console to date. Microsoft has also adopted this posture with their ID program. The indie revolution is heavily influencing games, and allowing this movement to continue on consoles is a smart move. Especially when fewer and fewer studios can execute at a AAA level.

Users didn’t move.

A lot of analysts mistook stagnant console numbers for lagging demand. It turns out, there really was just nothing else to buy. Despite hype about core games on mobile–that transition has yet to happen. Most titles console players would recognize as ‘core’ games have utterly failed to gain traction on tablets. Core gamers want core games exclusively on console or desktop while reserving mobile for a completely different experience.

Eventually we’ll see a major disruption in how and where games are consumed. It’s going to take longer than one console generation to transform core gamer habits. It also may be too early to tell. After all, we’re only a few months into this generation.

The fact is, the AAA economy isn’t sustainable. Massive layoffs, even while Sony is basking in post-hardware launch success, shows not all is well with the AAA end of the spectrum.

How to survive the mobile gaming apocalypse

I was listening to the latest Walled Garden podcast and towards the end they stopped just short of stating what many developers I talk to have been saying–mobile gaming is dead.

Ok, not actually dead. After all, mobile gaming revenue is higher than it’s ever been, and mobile consumption of everything is eating the planet. However, mobile gaming is completely dead as a business model for independent developers and undercapitalized startups.

IAP has become so dominant that there’s really only one somewhat reproducible way to make money in the AppStore: make a hamster wheel f2p game in a handful of established genres and spend tens of thousands of dollars a day on user acquisition to drive traffic to it. Despite many bold experiments, the charts increasingly bear this out.


This means that some companies with top charting mobile games aren’t actually making a profit as UA costs can eat up most of the revenue. Surely this will produce a shakeout and consolidation in 2014. This is similar to what happened to Facebook games circa 2010 causing a mass exodus to mobile.

Now that mobile is dead, where should you escape to? There are several options.


The PC, and more specifically Steam, remains the platform of choice for those who actually want to charge money for content. There’s a large market for premium games and Steam has loosened their gate with the advent of Greenlight. Some prominent developers have been abandoning mobile for PC with their new projects. Despite PC sales declining in the face of tablets, it makes sense. This is where the paying customers are.


A lot has been written here about the impending demise of consoles, but Sony and Microsoft managed to change up their business model and product strategy enough to have early success with both the PS4 and XBOX One. One of the big changes has been the thawing of the gated ecosystem and allowing independent developers to self-publish. Oh yeah, and on the Wii U also.

Next generation console owners are starved for content. There will be many independent successes over the next few years before the channel becomes completely saturated.


On one hand VR is merely a peripheral for existing games, on the other it’s part of an entirely new category of wearable computing and an emerging platform. Oculus Rift is the clear leader with a huge round of investment and development kits widespread. However a glut of VR headsets is on the horizon.

Oculus is building an ecosystem out of their device, but VR content can be distributed through any PC gaming channel. Although, supporting every single headset may be a nightmare for developers–isn’t it time for some kind of standard VR API?

Board games

Board games are a cottage industry yet a hot category on Kickstarter. As an example, Sandy Peteresen’s Cuthulu World Combat iOS game Kickstarter failed miserably, but when re-pitched as a board game, it blew past its funding goal. Going from digital to physical presents a lot of new challenges for developers, but does have a dedicated fan base of paying customers. Plus, you can’t pirate a board game!

Facebook / Web

Facebook games ‘died’ in 2010, but are ironically becoming an increasingly common alternative platform for mobile developers. Especially if you have a working web client already, why not put it on Facebook? The problem is the audience is decidedly non-hardcore. Facebook games can still make some money, but for a very specific audience. However, for hardcore games, the open web still remains a viable place to find an audience of paying gamers. Kongregate proves this.

What needs to change in mobile?

The supremacy of f2p and the very few options for user acquisition make the momentum towards free and the companies with enough money to compete in the mobile UA wars insurmountable. Apple could make some changes to the App Store to help support premium games and other alternative business models, however there really isn’t any incentive to do so–Either way, Apple sells phones. It’s difficult to foresee anything but the continuing dominance of f2p and mega-publishers on mobile in 2014. If you have a ton of cash and resources, solving this problem is hard, and thus very lucrative. For the rest of us, plan your strategy accordingly.

My Week with the XBOX One

A mere week after the outstanding launch of the PlayStation 4 comes Microsoft’s XBOX One with a similar success story. Hey–time for some bulletized observations:

Quick!  Where's the games??

Quick! Where’s the games??

The interface is hideous. I’m not a huge fan of Windows 8, but I do think Windows Mobile is pretty snazzy. Yet, Microsoft’s implementation of the “Metro” tile interface on XBOX One is bewildering. You’re constantly getting lost in a sea of scrolling tiles with no context. Especially considering the sheer number of panels on the screen at once, navigating with the controller is a pain. The XBOX One main shell seems designed to be used with a mouse or touch instead of a control pad.

Voice control is a neat trick, but not quite ready. I have to speak in hushed tones around my console because if I dare mention its name, I’m not sure what will happen. In my house, “XBOX” is a killing word.

TV Integration is probably awesome–if I watched TV. I don’t watch much TV, and I certainly don’t watch live TV. So, all of these DVR features on the XBOX One are lost on me. Still, the ability to hook in your TV’s HDMI feed and use the XBOX One as a DVR and cable box is pretty cool–especially when using voice control to search for content. It’s the dream of Google TV realized. I guess. This really isn’t a feature I care much about. I do love the universal IR blaster feature–shouting “XBOX On” to turn on all my equipment is a neat trick!

The actual box is ugly. It’s nowhere near as bad as the original XBOX, but can’t touch the beauty of the gleaming white original XBOX 360. That’s still among my favorite consumer electronics industrial designs. The XBOX One is huge and seems to resemble a 1980’s VCR.

The launch title lineup is strong. By far, Dead Rising 3 is my favorite next generation exclusive. Granted, I’m a huge fan of the series. I’m not a big racing game player, but friends of mine who are love the new Forza–especially with individual button feedback. Even the free2play Killer Instinct has defied expectations. Unlike the PlayStation 4, there aren’t many smaller indie digital exclusives–likely due to Microsoft’s recent reversal of their self-publishing policy. Regardless, the XBOX One currently has better games–the most important point!

Overall I’m quite pleased with the XBOX One. The hardware specs are a bit lower than the PS4 and it’s a little more expensive, but so far the games are strong and the platform shows a lot of promise for growth. Microsoft has also swerved a bit to avoid total disruption, but the verdict is still out. You can’t go wrong making either choice, but if you were to evaluate both the PS4 and XBOX One purely on games alone–I’d have to give the edge to XBOX.

My Week with the PlayStation 4

The next generation has arrived with Sony’s triumphant release of the PlayStation 4. The reviews have all been written–there’s no need to post a huge essay about it. However, it is time for my obligatory quick hardware review.

It’s a nice looking box. The PS4 continues Sony’s legacy of sleek industrial design with a surprisingly tiny and strangely slanted device. It’s small, light, and silent (well, mostly).

The DualShock 4 is the GREATEST CONTROLLER OF ALL TIME! I thought the DualShock 3 was perfect, but Sony has done the impossible and topped it with the DS4–it’s light and fits my hands perfectly. Also, the PS4 can charge the controller while switched off–something the PS3 never managed to do. Now if they can only find a way to turn off the annoying huge LED light while watching Netflix.

The redesigned PS4 dashboard is simple and concise. You’ll learn to appreciate this when you try the XBOX One (review incoming!) It’s easy to navigate–and most importantly, it’s very simple to find, purchase, and play GAMES!

Share Button!

The Share button is genius. With the rise of eSports and, The PS4 has its finger on the pulse of hardcore gaming with the ability to instantly stream live game video or post screenshots to social networks. I kind of can’t stand watching other people play video games–but I’m sure this will be popular with the vast majority of hardcore gamers that aren’t me. Although–uh, other, uses of the PS4 camera on Twitch may become even more popular.

What about the games? Killzone is gorgeous and has the best campaign of the series–which isn’t saying much. I mention Killzone because there aren’t many interesting PS4 exclusives at the moment. There’s heavy focus on “indie” and downloadable games which are an increasingly important part of the console ecosystem. The harsh development climate over the past few years has left few studios standing that can successfully ship a $75+ million game on a disc.

It’s nice, but rather mundane technology. The PS4 has the hardware edge over the XBOX One–but if you parse the stats, it seems not much more powerful than a mid-range PC. The previous generation shipped with GPUs a little ahead of cutting edge desktop computers, but were also much more expensive. Sony and Microsoft can’t afford to take a big loss on hardware this generation.

I really dig the PS4. Sony’s focus on “indie” and self-published games as well controlling costs is the best move they could have made given the circumstances. With two prominent free2play FPSes launching with the system, it’s clear Sony has adapted to the current market. They made sweeping changes to their business model and hardware strategy that may have successfully fended off disruption from mobile and tablets. The true effects of disruption may be felt later in the cycle when casual consumers fail to show up in the same numbers as before. Regardless, I’m relieved to have another platform to publish games on–as mobile is getting truly apocalyptic.