My Week with PSVR

Full disclosure, I’ve had a PSVR devkit for some time now, so this isn’t my first experience with the device. However, this certainly is my first taste of most PSVR launch content. I figured I’d post my impressions after a week with my PSVR launch bundle.

Best Optics In the Business

PSVR does not use fresnel lenses, thus you don’t see any god rays and glare on high contrast screens. Vive and Rift both suffer from these problems, which makes PSVR look a lot better than the competition. Many cite the lower resolution of the PSVR display as a problem, but I don’t think numbers tell the whole story. The screen door effect is not very noticeable, and I suspect there’s some way PSVR is packing those pixels together that make the slightly lower resolution a non-issue. PSVR looks great.

Fully Integrated With Sony’s Ecosystem

The great thing about the platform is they are combining a mature online store and gaming social network with VR. In many cases PSVR is ahead of the competition in community features. When you first don the PSVR headset, you’ll see the standard PlayStation 4 interface hovering in front of you as a giant virtual screen. Thus, all current PSN features are available to you in VR already. You can even click the Share button and stream VR gameplay live. There’s also a pop up menu to manage your friends list, invites, etc. inside any VR experience. The only weird thing is when you get an achievement you hear the sound, but don’t see any overlay telling you what you did.

Tracking Issues

PSVR uses colored LED lights for optical tracking–essentially the same solution Sony created for their PS3 Move controllers in 2010. In fact, the launch bundle comes with what seem to be new, deadstock Move controllers as its hand tracking solution.

Tracking is iffy. It seems that lamps, bright lights, and sunlight streaking through windows can throw PSVR’s tracking off. I find that it works much better at night with the room lights visible to the PS4 Eye camera turned off. I also replaced my original PlayStation 4 Eye camera with the V2 version in the launch bundle to no avail.

Even more annoying is calibration. Holding the PSVR up in precise positions so that the lights are visible to the camera can be quite a pain. Not only that, but many games require their own calibration involving standing in a place where your head fits inside a camera overlay representing the best position to play in.

The hand controllers are jittery even under the best circumstances. Some games seem to have smoother tracking than others–probably via filtering Move input data. Still, given the price of the bundle, Move is an acceptable solution. Just not ideal.

One advantage to this approach is PSVR can also track the DualShock 4 via that previously annoying light bar on the back. Having a positionally tracked controller adds an element of immersion to non-hand tracked games previously unseen.

The Content

Despite PSVR using a PS4 which pales in power compared to, say, a juiced up Oculus-ready PC, the PSVR launch experiences are second to none. Sony is an old pro at getting together strong titles to launch a new platform. They have made some great choices here.

Worlds

The amount of free content you get with the Launch Bundle is staggering. In addition to the new VR version of Playroom and a disc filled with free demos, you also get Worlds–Sony London’s brilliant showcase of VR mini games and experiences. The Deep is a perfect beginner’s VR introduction–a lush, underwater experience that rivals anything I’ve seen on Rift or Vive. London Heist is my favorite, combining storytelling and hand-tracked action in what is often compared to a VR Guy Ritchie film.

Arkham VR

This is the single coolest VR experience I’ve ever had. It’s really more like a narrative experience with some light gameplay elements. Some are complaining that this barely qualifies as a game and is way too short for $20, but I disagree. This is the gold standard in VR storytelling–a truly unique experience that a lot of developers can learn from. It combines puzzle solving, story, interactive props, and immersive environments into a VR experience that makes you really feel like the Caped Crusader. This is the game I use to showcase PSVR and nobody has left disappointed.

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Battlezone

Battlezone is my other favorite launch title right now, if I can find other people online (a definite problem given the small, but growing PSVR user base). This is a VR update to Atari’s coin-op classic in the form of a co-op multiplayer vehicle shooter. Guide a team of futuristic tank pilots over a randomly generated hexagonal map as you journey on a quest to destroy the enemy base. This game requires great teamwork and voice communication, which makes it all the more immersive. The positionally tracked DualShock 4 adds to the immersion in the cockpit as well.

Rigs

Guerilla does everything wrong (including uninterruptible tutorials) in VR here, defying all conventions. I have no problems with it, but this makes almost everyone I know violently ill. Apparently I am immune to VR sickness. Rigs is probably unplayable by the vast majority of players even with all the comfort modes turned on. If you want to test your so-called “VR Legs”, then try this game. If you can manage to play this without puking, you’re in for a great competitive online experience–that is, if you can find other players easily.

Wayward Sky

This game started out last year as a Gear VR launch title called Ikarus, which was pulled from the store shortly after its release. Uber’s small mobile VR demo has now reappeared on PSVR as the expanded and enhanced Wayward Sky–an innovative take on point-and-click adventure games in VR. The first stage is essentially a remixed and remastered version of the short Gear VR demo that came out last year. Once you complete this stage, the game opens up with a lot more levels and an all new story line. This is another gentle introduction to VR as it doesn’t involve a lot of movement or complicated mechanics. It’s largely point and click puzzle solving affair, with a few areas that require you to use your hands to manipulate objects.

In Conclusion

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My dream VR platform would be PSVR’s optics, Vive’s tracking, and Oculus’ controllers. Until that singularity happens, we’re stuck with all of these different systems. PSVR is incredibly compelling, and the platform I recommend to most people. It’s cheap and surprisingly good. Most of my current favorite VR games are on PSVR right now. I personally don’t find its limitations a problem–but it will be interesting to see how the average gaming public responds. Initial sales are promising, and there is way more high profile VR content on the horizon. Dare I say Sony has won this first round?

My Favorite VR Experiences So Far

Now that I’ve had plenty of time to go through the launch content of both Oculus and Vive, I figured I’d highlight my favorite experiences you can try for both devices instead of a typical product review. Many of these games are available for both platforms, while some are exclusive.

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My Retail Vive Finally Arrived!

Adr1ft (Oculus)

This is the flagship release for Oculus and deservedly so. Although not a pure VR experience (it also works as a standard game), it’s an absolutely wild trip in VR. Billed as a First Person Experience (FPX), it ranks somewhere between a walking simulator like Firewatch and an adventure such as Bioshock on the “Is It a Game?” scale.

This is consistently one of the top-selling Oculus titles, yet ranks near the bottom on comfort. I had no nausea issues at all, but I generally don’t feel uncomfortable in most VR games. I can see how free-floating in zero gravity, desperately grasping at oxygen canisters as you slowly suffocate to death inside a claustrophobic space suit can cause issues with those prone to simulation sickness. Regardless, this shows that it pays to be hardcore when making VR experiences–especially at this early adopter stage of the market.

A stunning debut for Adam Orth’s threeonezero studio.

Firma (Oculus)

This perhaps one of my absolute favorite pure VR games so far. Think Lunar Lander, Space Taxi or Thrust in VR. If this was a standard video game, it would be mundane, but as a VR experience I really do feel like I have a job piloting a tiny lander craft on a desolate moon base. It actually sort of achieves presence for me–but not the feeling of being in another reality…more like being in an ‘80s sci-fi movie.

Originally available via Oculus Share for years–it’s obvious that a lot of work has been put into this game to get it here for the commercial Oculus release. There are tons of missions, great voice acting, and a lot of fun mechanics and scenarios. This game is giving me plenty of ideas on how to adapt my old Ludum Dare game to VR.

Strangely, this game is in Oculus’ Early Access section, even though I consider it a complete game.

The Apollo 11 Virtual Reality Experience (Oculus, Vive)

An astounding educational journey through America’s moon landing told via VR. This is better than any field trip I took as a kid to the Boston Museum of Science, that’s for sure. This is just the tip of the spear when it comes to education and VR.

Hover Junkers (Vive)

Hover Junkers requires the most physical activity out of any VR game I’ve played–So much so that after 20 minutes of shooting, cowering behind my hovercraft’s hull for cover, and frantically speeding around post-apocalyptic landscapes, my Vive was soaked in sweat. One thing is for sure, public VR arcades are going to need some kind of solution to keep these headsets sanitary. Hover Junkers certainly is the most exciting multiplayer experience I’ve had in VR so far.

Budget Cuts (Vive)

The absolute best example of room scale VR. I didn’t really get it when watching the videos, but when I was finally able to try the demo on my own Vive….wow. This is the game I let everyone try when they first experience Vive. It really nails the difference between seated, controller-based VR and a room scale hand-tracked experience. This is the first “real game” I’ve played that uses all of these elements. So many firsts here, and done so well.

The past month has been a very encouraging start for VR. At this early stage there are already several games that give me that “just one more try” lure. This is surprising given that many current VR titles are small in scope, and in some cases partially-finished early access experiences. With the launch of PSVR later this year, we’re sure to see more full-sized VR games…whatever that means.

The Basics of Hand Tracked VR Input Design

Ever since my revelation at Oculus Connect I’ve been working on a project using hand tracking and VR. For now, it’s using my recently acquired Vive devkit. However, I’ve been researching design techniques for PSVR and Oculus Touch to keep the experience portable across many different hand tracking input schemes. Hand tracking has presented a few new problems to solve, similar to my initial adventures in head tracking interfaces.

The Vive's hand controller

Look Ma, No Hands!

The first problem I came across when designing an application that works on both Vive and Oculus Touch is the representation of your hands in VR. With Oculus Touch, most applications feature a pair of “ghost hands” that mimic the current pose of your hands and fingers. Since Oculus’ controllers can track your thumb and first two fingers, and presumably the rest are gripped around the handle, these ghost hands tend to accurately represent what your hands are doing in real life.

Oculus Touch controller

This metaphor breaks down with Vive as it doesn’t track your hands, but the position of the rod-like controllers you are holding. Vive games I’ve tried that show your hands end up feeling like waving around hands on a stick–there’s a definite disconnect between the visual of your hands in VR and where your brain thinks they are in real life. PSVR has this problem as well, as the Move controllers used with the current devkit are similar to Vive’s controllers.

You can alleviate this somewhat. Because there is a natural way most users tend to grip Move and Vive controllers, you can model and position the “hand on a stick” in the most likely way the controllers are gripped. This can make static hands in VR more convincing.

In any case, you have a few problems when you grab an object.

For Oculus, the act of grabbing is somewhat natural–you can clench your first two fingers and thumb into a “grab” type motion to pick something up. In the case of Bullet Train, this is how you pick up guns. The translucent representation of your hands means you can still see your hand pose and the gripped object at the same time. There’s not much to think about other than where you attach the held object to the hand model.

It also helps that in Bullet Train the objects you can grab have obvious handles and holding points. You can pose the hand to match the most likely hand position on a grabbed object without breaking immersion.

With Vive and PSVR you have a problem if you are using the “hand on a stick” technique. When you “grab” a virtual object by pressing the trigger, how do you show the hand holding something? It seems like the best answer is, you don’t! Check this video of Uber Entertainment’s awesome Wayward Sky PSVR demo:

Notice anything? When you grab something, the hand disappears. All you can see is the held object floating around in front of you.

This is a great solution for holding arbitrary shaped items because you don’t have to create a potentially infinite amount of hand grip animations. Because the user isn’t really grabbing anything and is instead clicking a trigger on a controller, there is no “real” grip position for your hand anyway. You also don’t have the problem of parts of the hands intersecting with the held object.

This isn’t a new technique. In fact, one of the earliest Vive demos, Job Simulator, does the exact same thing. Your brain fills in the gaps and it feels so natural that I just never noticed it!

Virtual Objects, Real Boundaries

The next problem I encountered is what do you do when your hand passes through virtual objects, but the objects can’t? For instance, you can be holding an object, and physically move your real, tracked hand through a virtual wall. The held object, bound by the engine’s physics simulation, will hit the wall while your hand continues to drag it through. Chaos erupts!

You can turn off collisions while an object is held, but what fun is that? You want to be able to knock things over and otherwise interact with the world while holding stuff. Plus, what happens when you let go of an object while inside a collision volume?

What I ended up doing is making the object detach, or fall out of your virtual hand, as soon as it hits something else. You can tweak this by making collisions with smaller, non-static objects less likely to detach the held object since they will be pushed around by your hand.

For most VR developers these are the first two things you encounter when designing and experience for hand-tracking VR systems. It seems Oculus Touch makes a lot of these problems go away, but we’ve just scratched the surface of the issues needed to be solved when your real hands interact with a virtual world.