My Week with PSVR

Full disclosure, I’ve had a PSVR devkit for some time now, so this isn’t my first experience with the device. However, this certainly is my first taste of most PSVR launch content. I figured I’d post my impressions after a week with my PSVR launch bundle.

Best Optics In the Business

PSVR does not use fresnel lenses, thus you don’t see any god rays and glare on high contrast screens. Vive and Rift both suffer from these problems, which makes PSVR look a lot better than the competition. Many cite the lower resolution of the PSVR display as a problem, but I don’t think numbers tell the whole story. The screen door effect is not very noticeable, and I suspect there’s some way PSVR is packing those pixels together that make the slightly lower resolution a non-issue. PSVR looks great.

Fully Integrated With Sony’s Ecosystem

The great thing about the platform is they are combining a mature online store and gaming social network with VR. In many cases PSVR is ahead of the competition in community features. When you first don the PSVR headset, you’ll see the standard PlayStation 4 interface hovering in front of you as a giant virtual screen. Thus, all current PSN features are available to you in VR already. You can even click the Share button and stream VR gameplay live. There’s also a pop up menu to manage your friends list, invites, etc. inside any VR experience. The only weird thing is when you get an achievement you hear the sound, but don’t see any overlay telling you what you did.

Tracking Issues

PSVR uses colored LED lights for optical tracking–essentially the same solution Sony created for their PS3 Move controllers in 2010. In fact, the launch bundle comes with what seem to be new, deadstock Move controllers as its hand tracking solution.

Tracking is iffy. It seems that lamps, bright lights, and sunlight streaking through windows can throw PSVR’s tracking off. I find that it works much better at night with the room lights visible to the PS4 Eye camera turned off. I also replaced my original PlayStation 4 Eye camera with the V2 version in the launch bundle to no avail.

Even more annoying is calibration. Holding the PSVR up in precise positions so that the lights are visible to the camera can be quite a pain. Not only that, but many games require their own calibration involving standing in a place where your head fits inside a camera overlay representing the best position to play in.

The hand controllers are jittery even under the best circumstances. Some games seem to have smoother tracking than others–probably via filtering Move input data. Still, given the price of the bundle, Move is an acceptable solution. Just not ideal.

One advantage to this approach is PSVR can also track the DualShock 4 via that previously annoying light bar on the back. Having a positionally tracked controller adds an element of immersion to non-hand tracked games previously unseen.

The Content

Despite PSVR using a PS4 which pales in power compared to, say, a juiced up Oculus-ready PC, the PSVR launch experiences are second to none. Sony is an old pro at getting together strong titles to launch a new platform. They have made some great choices here.

Worlds

The amount of free content you get with the Launch Bundle is staggering. In addition to the new VR version of Playroom and a disc filled with free demos, you also get Worlds–Sony London’s brilliant showcase of VR mini games and experiences. The Deep is a perfect beginner’s VR introduction–a lush, underwater experience that rivals anything I’ve seen on Rift or Vive. London Heist is my favorite, combining storytelling and hand-tracked action in what is often compared to a VR Guy Ritchie film.

Arkham VR

This is the single coolest VR experience I’ve ever had. It’s really more like a narrative experience with some light gameplay elements. Some are complaining that this barely qualifies as a game and is way too short for $20, but I disagree. This is the gold standard in VR storytelling–a truly unique experience that a lot of developers can learn from. It combines puzzle solving, story, interactive props, and immersive environments into a VR experience that makes you really feel like the Caped Crusader. This is the game I use to showcase PSVR and nobody has left disappointed.

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Battlezone

Battlezone is my other favorite launch title right now, if I can find other people online (a definite problem given the small, but growing PSVR user base). This is a VR update to Atari’s coin-op classic in the form of a co-op multiplayer vehicle shooter. Guide a team of futuristic tank pilots over a randomly generated hexagonal map as you journey on a quest to destroy the enemy base. This game requires great teamwork and voice communication, which makes it all the more immersive. The positionally tracked DualShock 4 adds to the immersion in the cockpit as well.

Rigs

Guerilla does everything wrong (including uninterruptible tutorials) in VR here, defying all conventions. I have no problems with it, but this makes almost everyone I know violently ill. Apparently I am immune to VR sickness. Rigs is probably unplayable by the vast majority of players even with all the comfort modes turned on. If you want to test your so-called “VR Legs”, then try this game. If you can manage to play this without puking, you’re in for a great competitive online experience–that is, if you can find other players easily.

Wayward Sky

This game started out last year as a Gear VR launch title called Ikarus, which was pulled from the store shortly after its release. Uber’s small mobile VR demo has now reappeared on PSVR as the expanded and enhanced Wayward Sky–an innovative take on point-and-click adventure games in VR. The first stage is essentially a remixed and remastered version of the short Gear VR demo that came out last year. Once you complete this stage, the game opens up with a lot more levels and an all new story line. This is another gentle introduction to VR as it doesn’t involve a lot of movement or complicated mechanics. It’s largely point and click puzzle solving affair, with a few areas that require you to use your hands to manipulate objects.

In Conclusion

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My dream VR platform would be PSVR’s optics, Vive’s tracking, and Oculus’ controllers. Until that singularity happens, we’re stuck with all of these different systems. PSVR is incredibly compelling, and the platform I recommend to most people. It’s cheap and surprisingly good. Most of my current favorite VR games are on PSVR right now. I personally don’t find its limitations a problem–but it will be interesting to see how the average gaming public responds. Initial sales are promising, and there is way more high profile VR content on the horizon. Dare I say Sony has won this first round?

$100: The New Alternative to Free

I was listening to the Combat Jack podcast over the holidays where his guest was Nipsey Hussle: A Compton rapper famous for successfully releasing a $100 mixtape. Considering mixtapes are used as a free giveaway to promote an artist, selling 1,000 copies at $100 a pop is kind of incredible. Nipsey didn’t just set the price, he turned paying for it into a movement.

Oh, and the mixtape is good, but I prefer the “Chop not Slop” remix version.

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During the interview, Nispey said he got the idea of the $100 mixtape from the book, Contagious. The first chapter is about a restaurant that created a $100 Philly Cheesesteak in an attempt to start some buzz. The rest of the book is a typical hand-wavey marketing tome using non-scientific anecdotal evidence to prove the author’s premise about why ideas catch on. Nispey is now working on a book with the author based on his experience selling Crenshaw. Maybe I’ll dig that one.

Still, this got me thinking about a similar trend in games. As we’ve discussed before, in this era of free everything, early access and alpha funding are new ways games are financing development long before completion. In some cases, you pay more for early access than the released game. Take Planetary Annihilation as an example. Early access runs you $90–nearly the price of Nipsey’s mixtape.

In other interviews, Nipsey stated that he wants to be less of a record label and more of the “urban Sanrio.” Essentially selling physical product and using music to promote it. This is a similar model that streetwear brands have used and somewhat reflective of a growing trend in gaming where physical products are starting to become a significant engine of monetization.

In the era of free, the relationship between your players and their wallets is evolving in surprising ways. It turns out, those who want to pay REALLY want to pay. The one-size-fits-all model of $60 games may be dead, but simply making everything a f2p hamster wheel isn’t a blanket solution either.

Paymium: Walking Away From Free2Play

Many small mobile game developers I talk with are considering abandoning pure Free2Play in favor of paid apps with in-app-purchases–AKA “paymium”. A great example of this is on the latest Walled Garden podcast featuring Plague Inc. creator, James Vaughan.

At first, Plague Inc. was a simple premium app. After quickly building a rabid following, he added purchasable items that can otherwise be earned in-game. This has been an extremely successful business model for Plague, Inc. and many other top games from the likes of Rovio and Halfbrick.

James’ sound reasoning for his use of Paymium is that he dislikes games purely designed around IAP and thus made a game he wanted to play. Making small games is a very personal process. If you don’t like what you’re making it’s not going to be good.

Another reason developers are considering this approach is that the top free download charts on iOS are completely bought and sold. If you look at any game in the top 10 free downloads, it’s safe to assume that spot is paid for with heavy advertising spends along with other somewhat underhanded tactics. The latter may get you bounced from the App Store, but it doesn’t stop most publishers from finding a way.

The paid charts are theoretically more honest. Because you have to tack on the price of the app along with whatever you pay for guaranteed downloads, paid chart manipulation is more expensive. Yet, this may still be common considering how large advertising budgets are for the top mobile games.

A great new paymium example is Contra: Evolution, a clever mobile remake of Konami’s NES classic from PunchBox. The game costs 99 cents on iPhone and $2.99 on iPad. Both versions feature a plethora of in-app-purchases.

Contra has been floating around the top of the paid charts for a while–although still scraping the bottom of the top grossing. This illustrates the depressing reality of premium apps. Even a top 5 paid download barely registers on the grossing charts. Yet, any indie developer would kill for the type of revenue Contra is making.

What did Contra do right? The following is a bunch of hand-wavey, rear-view-mirror driving. It could all be true. Or the game’s success could purely be fictional and entirely paid for by outrageous ad spends and thus this entire article is nonsense. Anyway…

First, there’s the brand. Brands generally aren’t worth much in mobile. If you look at the top apps, the overwhelming majority are original IPs. Yet, Contra has strong awareness among retro gaming enthusiasts. Some brands matter in mobile.

Secondly, the game is good. Over a decade since the last reboot, PunchBox went to the origins of the series with a remake of a classic that is competitive with current mobile games. As we’ve seen in Predictably Irrational, it’s extremely difficult for a paid product to compete against free at any quality level. PunchBox pulled it off

Finally, people who have paid for your app are already invested. Theoretically, they are more likely to spend again. Contra’s unimpressive top grossing rank may not actually prove this out. However, mega-hits like Angry Birds and Jetpack Joyride have used paymium to great success. Contra’s low grossing rank may be due to poor monetization design instead of a flawed model.

A few years ago I would have laughed if you suggested launching a premium app. Now I’m not so sure. The new rule is, there is no rule about monetization. F2P isn’t one size fits all–but, how do you actually find what does fit?

FarmVille 2 Illustrates Zynga and Facebook’s Desperation

The launch of FarmVille 2 last week was interesting to watch. Sequels to social games seem like a bad idea–why fragment the user base of a highly popular service for a numerical sequel? MMOs have had the same problem in the past and Zynga’s own Mafia Wars 2 is largely seen as a failure. I was curious to see what approach Zynga would take with their next attempt at a sequel to a flagship game.

The good news is FarmVille 2 is a gorgeous and even charming follow-up to the original game. The 3D graphics using Flash 11 are beautiful and the whole thing is ultra polished. This is one of the slickest Facebook games I’ve ever seen. The mega talented team that built this should follow all the ex-EA executive carpetbaggers and bail. I bet they could raise money and build a great company based on quality like this–for the right platform, of course.

As we’ve discussed here for years, and has become obvious in recent times, Facebook games are dead. Zynga’s and Facebook’s catastrophic stock declines are both linked to a collapse of the Facebook game ecosystem. Both Zynga and Facebook have failed to effectively monetize mobile users, especially in gaming.

Earlier this year, Zynga actually shut down the iOS version of FarmVille. They just couldn’t figure out how to make one of the most popular social games of all time work on mobile. Yet, Zynga doubles down on Facebook with an elaborate and exquisitely detailed sequel. The fact that the primary platform for FarmVille 2 is Facebook proves Zynga still has no effective mobile strategy. It could be contractual. If so, Zynga is tied to a sinking ship.

FarmVille 2 is also a sign of desperation. A few years back social game developers flooded Facebook with spam notifications from games as a so-called ‘viral expansion loop’. Facebook newsfeeds were cluttered with stories about lost sheep and found energy packs. Concerned with spam levels worsening the user experience, Facebook severely restricted access to viral channels.

FarmVille 2 seems to violate the spirit of Facebook’s carefully considered spam policies put in place after the viral channel crackdown. The biggest evidence being the opt-out newsfeed notification. If you look at almost every alert dialog in FarmVille 2, the only way to not have it not shared on your newsfeed is to click a tiny checkbox in the lower left corner. I can’t say I haven’t seen this tactic before, but it seems extra insidious in FarmVille 2’s case. The box is almost invisible and it has to be clicked every time, as the check box is reset on every alert. As a result, FarmVille 2 is bringing Facebook spam back to 2010 levels of annoyance.

Yes, FarmVille 2 uses sleazy tactics to gain free users. Even worse is the fact that Facebook enables this tactic. It’s not like Zynga is some rogue developer. Their special relationship with Facebook gives them access to a lot of early platform perks–including timeline stories, frictionless permissions, and now deceptive spam newsfeed posts. Both Facebook and Zynga are seemingly out of ideas and are going back to blatant spamming to reach and retain users.

Oh, and you can turn off newsfeed spam using this method.