A Weekend at Oculus Connect

I spent this past weekend at Oculus Connect and have just now had the time to process what I saw. For Oculus to go from a humble Kickstarter project a few years ago to a capacity filled conference rife with amazing demos and prototypes by countless developers is mind-boggling. I know I said VR in 2014 is like Mobile in 2002, but the pace of progress is staggering. The maturation path for VR is going to be MUCH quicker. Is it 2005 already?

...and all I got was this lousy t-shirt.

…and all I got was this lousy t-shirt.

As I stated before, Gear VR is the most important wearable platform in the universe. I’ve been developing Gear VR games for a while and am thoroughly convinced this wireless, lightweight platform will have far more reach than VR tethered to your desktop.

The GearVR demo area.

The GearVR demo area.

The apps on display were great, but I even saw a few Gear VR demos from random developers in the hotel hallways that blew away what were officially shown in Samsung’s display area. Developer interest for Gear VR is very high. Once it’s commercially available, a flood of content is soon upon us.

Despite the intense interest in the platform, I spoke to a few desktop and console developers who dismissed Gear VR as a distraction and are ignoring it–which I think is really short-sighted.

It’s true that there may be a division in audiences. Gear VR may be the larger, casual audience while apps built around Oculus’ astounding Crescent Bay platform could be for a highly monetizable market of core enthusiasts. Either route is smart business. Depending on how long you can hold out for customer traction, that is.

Oh, and Crescent Bay…was a revolution. There’s probably not much more to be said about it that hasn’t already–but the ridiculous momentum behind Oculus’ path from the DK1 to Crescent Bay makes me question the competition. Oculus has hired all of the smartest people I know and have billions of dollars to spend on VR R&D–which is their main business, not a side project. Will competitors like Sony really commit enough resources to compete with the relentless pace of Oculus’ progress?

Quick Notes: E3 2013 Edition

WAR!

E3 2013 is over! This was the most exciting E3 in years. GAMES ARE BACK! Sony and Microsoft are putting up a vigorous defense against the cow clickers and hamster wheels that have taken over gaming in the mobile and social era. It was so refreshing to see such a variety of new IPs that are actual games–games based on fun, mechanics, and experience instead of pure compulsion. I’m psyched for the PlayStation 4 and XBOX One. I pre-ordered both during their respective press conferences. A few notes:

Microsoft needs to fire their entire marketing department. Everyone was talking about Microsoft’s DRM strategy and not the games. Microsoft has completely lost control of the narrative and it’s hurting their ability to promote the XBOX One as an actual games platform.

Microsoft’s strategy of promoting the XBOX One as some kind of media center hub is the wrong one this early in the cycle. They need to engage early adopters for a console launch–people such as myself. All we want to hear about are games. Sony smartly focused on games–even if most of them were multi-platform.

The new Sony is poised for victory. Roles seem to have switched this generation, with Microsoft’s XBOX 360 success creating an attitude of arrogance that has led them to a tone-deaf press conference and hostility to so-called “indie” developers. This is the same attitude Sony had when the PS3 launched that caused a huge decline in market share.

Sony has learned from their mistakes and have radically changed their publishing model. They have embraced indie developers and flexible business models as evidenced by two prominent f2p PS4 titles on the show floor. I talked to many talented developers who had PS4 kits but were refused by Microsoft for XBOX One developer access.

Where was mobile? Compared to last year, mobile had a much reduced presence. Many publishers showed mobile titles along with their console slate, but gone were huge booths from GREE and other Asian mobile powerhouses. It was interesting to see tablet and mobile elements blended in to console games, such as in Ubisoft’s awesome demo for The Division. As discussed here before, companion apps have a long way to go–but this was probably the best example to date.

Hardware on the fringe. Lots of niche hardware made noise at E3. Not the least of which was Oculus Rift. With the show floor abuzz with news of the HD version, it seems at least Sony may be investigating supporting it. Microconsoles such as NVidia’s Project Shield (not so micro at $349) and the Oyua made big splashes too. I’m skeptical of the long-term viability of these platforms–although TowerFall convinced me to pre-order my Ouya.

Nintendo? Where was Nintendo? Their decision to broadcast their press conference on Nintendo Direct may have been an error–but perhaps a good strategy since they really had nothing to show that could counteract the massive PS4 and XBOX One announcements. Their booth was heavily attended, but Nintendo was seemingly out of the running. Luckily, they have enough cash to hunker down and weather the storm this generation.

Favorite games at the show. I never really spend much time waiting in line to watch demos or play games at E3, but I did have a few favorites upon cursory examination. Killer is Dead is a spiritual successor to Killer 7 from Grasshopper Manufacture, and looks fantastic. Dragon’s Crown is a gorgeous 2D side scrolling RPG by Vanillaware in the same vein as Capcom’s old D&D coin-ops. Keep your eye on The Order: 1886 for the PlayStation 4. This will be one of THE exclusive PS4 titles to watch.

Anyway, this was a GREAT show. I’m really excited for the next generation consoles. GAMEPLAY IS BACK.

A Few Quick Notes: GDC2013 Edition

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GDC 2013 Rundown

GDC has become increasingly irrelevant over the past 5 years or so as influence has moved away from the realm of cloistered AAA console game teams and to so-called “indie” developers and the disruptive platforms of mobile and social. Because of this, you can get much better information having conversations with other developers. I spent most of GDC talking to people–you can always watch the good presentations on the GDC Vault.

The trend for 2013 is an industry wide panic over free2play. Presentations and panels worried over whether f2p games are ethical and how the game industry is supposed to survive through this disruption. Considering this is a conversation game developers have been having since 2009, it just goes to show how long it takes for GDC to catch on to major trends.

“Indie” developers were the big celebrities this year. So much so that formerly closed platforms from Nintendo and Sony bent over backwards to encourage garage developers to create content. Nintendo greatly loosened requirements for their development program and even revealed HTML5 support for the Wii U. Sony eliminated concept approval. This shows there are some radical changes ahead for the next generation–Changes I suggested years ago on this blog.

The biggest star of the show was Oculus VR. The wait time to try the Oculus Rift headset grew to over 2 and a half hours by the final day of GDC. I got in to see it and came away hopeful, but unimpressed. The current prototype headset is uncomfortable, but I didn’t spent much time adjusting it. The display resolution is low, causing a screen door effect. When I turned my head, the screen smeared to the point where I couldn’t see anything.

These problems are being addressed. They showed me the physical part for the new screen–the retail version of Oculus will fix the resolution and latency issues. The current kit is strictly for developers and mega-nerdy early adopters. It’s pretty neat for a $300 prototype, but far from a finished product.

I was more impressed with Infinite Z’s zSpace virtual holography system that was on display at Unity3D’s booth. It costs over 10X what Oculus does for no apparent reason. Still, being able to draw 3D splines in thin air and look around them was really cool.

Overall, GDC had a lot of opportunity on display as far as new devices, markets, and tools–but a lot of uncertainty on how to actually make money producing games.

Favorite Quotes of GDC

  • “Cokeheads are better than publishers.”

  • “They said they’d publish my game if I turn it into a Skinner-box.”

  • “The reason why you won’t close the deal is because you’re too competent.”